Logical Appeal

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Definition: Logical Appeal

This is a method of persuasion that appeals to the customer’s rational or logical faculties. It is one of the three most important tools of persuasion as outlined by Aristotle: ethos (ethical persuasion), logos (logical persuasion) and pathos (emotional persuasion). Logical persuasion has to be based on sound logic or else, there are good chances of it unravelling rapidly. A good method of logical persuasion is by comparison of alternatives. It is the strongest mode of persuasion, according to Aristotle, because it is based on the truth. Another method of logical persuasion is the cause-and-effect description, e.g., the advertising of a sugar-free substitute to control obesity can be based on the logic that excessive sugar intake increases weight. If a person on a diet wants to drink beer, the logical choice for him would be to go in for light beer or one that is less filling.

Appeals may be positive or negative, as related to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Advertisers choose between rational (logical ) and emotional appeals based on whether the product is seen as being likely to involve high or low affective or cognitive evaluation., e.g., a box of chocolates may score high on emotional involvement and the advertiser may use emotional cues such as home-made, nostalgia and warm in the advertising campaign but a product such as toothpaste is evaluated logically for its ability to fight germs and prevent bad odour.

Logical appeal may also play on the value-for-money psychological construct, wherein it persuades consumers that its product or service is cheaper and better than its competitor brands.

A logical appeal by Pepsodent toothpaste



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