In-Store Marketing

Posted in Marketing and Strategy Terms, Total Reads: 588
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Definition: In-Store Marketing

In-store marketing refers to the practice of promoting a product by communicating with the consumer at the point of purchase. In-store advertising includes advertisements on shopping carts, aisles or shelves. It also includes in-store promotion options like live demonstrations, sampling, instant coupons etc.


It attempts to leverage on the in-store decisions made by consumers in a retail outlet. Unplanned purchases are defined as those retail items bought that the shopper did not have in mind before entering the retail outlet. In-store decisions include the sum of generally planned, substitute and unplanned purchases including reminder and impulse purchases. Numerous studies have shown that consumers in many product categories make the bulk of their final brand decisions in the store, including as much as 70-80% of purchase decisions. Products characterized by low involvement, low brand loyalty often fall into this category. Moreover, sales of a newly launched brand can be accelerated through in-store promotions allowing the company to improve consumer awareness about the product as well as educate them about its benefits.


For example, a brand of cooking oil or a newly launched pasta brand can set up cooking stations in retail outlets providing live demonstration and sampling- triggering consumer awareness as well as trials. When Ching’s Secret launched in India, it used a creative mix of promotion ideas to promote Chinese cuisine and the brand’s range of sauces, pastes and noodles. They celebrated the Chinese New Year at Haiko mall in Mumbai with seminars on Chinese cooking and live demos. They also organized cooking classes across retail outlets to reach out to their target base- Indian housewives.

 

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