Batch Picking

Posted in Operations and Supply Chain Terms, Total Reads: 425

Definition: Batch Picking

Batch Picking is defined as the method of pulling inventory which pulls stocks to fill multiple orders simultaneously. This in turn, saves time as the orders are batched together to reduce the number of trips to the same locations within the warehouse to retrieve product.

Batch-picking systems are general in nature when it comes to their applications in food, fashion, non-food, and e-commerce segment.

The advantage of Batch Picking is that more product cube can be gathered in a single pass of the warehouse. However, warehouses need to ensure that they have sufficient room to stage the orders that have been batch picked. Batch picking increases both throughput and operator efficiency. It optimizes order-picking effectiveness by maximizing pick quantities and minimizing operator walking distances.


Batch picking is valuable for operations that will profit from maximizing order consolidation, especially in larger warehouses where the amount of movement that is required to gather orders would be considerably decreased by maximizing the cube that is collated in a single pass.

Operations with restricted picking equipment resources like man-up or narrow-aisle equipment should reflect on batch picking to maximize equipment utilization.



Example of Batch Picking:

Batch Picking in a grocery store, can be thought of, like taking a trip to the grocery store with your shopping list and those of some of your neighbors as well. In one trip of the grocery store, you will have fulfilled several orders. Subsequently, the travel time per line item picked will be decreased by approximately the number of orders per batch. The key benefit of batch picking is a decline in travel time per line item.



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