Posted in Operations and Supply Chain Terms, Total Reads: 154

Definition: Interline

Interline or Interlining, which is also called interline ticketing, is an intended business concurrence connecting individual airlines to handle passengers traveling on itineraries that usually have need of several airlines.



Interlining agreements varies from code-sharing agreements in the sense that code-sharing agreements generally implies to numbering a flight with the airline's code even though the flight is managed by some other airline. However, code-share associations can affect whether an e-ticket can be issued. Both the code-share marketing carrier and code-share operating carrier should have an interline agreement with all added carriers in the itinerary to permit a single ticket to be issued.

Interline agreements have directional nature.

For example, it might be possible for Japanese Airlines to issue the ticket on a Japanese-Thai itinerary but Thailand might not be able to be issuer on the same itinerary.

Airlines that have been established for many years are occasionally called legacy or full-service airlines. Formerly, only large network carriers namely United Airlines and Lufthansa used to have electronic ticket interline agreements but the IATA authorization to get rid of paper tickets at the finish of 2007 has altered this by forcing smaller carriers to employ electronic ticketing.

For example, United Airlines has an interline ticketing contract with opponents American Airlines and British Airways. Minor legacy carriers normally have interline agreements with large network carriers which fly into their zone. The majority of new low-cost carrier airlines that only sell directly to clients do not hold up interlining at all.

If no interline ticketing agreement exists, then two individual tickets will need to be issued and passengers will have to recover their bags and hold it to the linking airline for check-in. Itineraries with interline associations such as this are dicey for travelers since the second carrier may be uninformed of delays or problems with the arriving flight and it is more likely for baggage to be misplaced.



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