Order Picking

Posted in Operations and Supply Chain Terms, Total Reads: 214
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Definition: Order Picking

Order picking is defined as the procedure of dragging the items from inventory to load a buyer’s order. It is often considered as one of the most labor concentrated activity in a warehouse. Order picking is a central phase in any warehouse.


It constitutes as much as 55% of the total operation expenses within any distribution centre, in comparison to shipping, storage and receiving stages and has an undeviating effect on customer contentment intensity. The aptitude to both swiftly and precisely route consumer orders is currently an indispensable part of doing successful business.

 

It is necessary to put into practice an order picking method which is correct for your business and clientele. The following considerations must be kept in mind while choosing the same:

•kind of process

• uniqueness of produce handled

• number of dealings and orders

• Picks per order

• extent of pick

• Picks per Stock Keeping Units

• overall SKUs


Some of the orders picking methods are discussed as below:

•Zone picking: Every order picker is allocated an explicit zone and will only realize order picking contained by this region.

•Batch picking: An order picker is allocated and picks manifold orders at the same time, reducing trips to each site.

•Wave picking: A disparity of zone and batch picking. All zones are picked at the similar time and the items are later on arranged and combined into individual orders or shipments.


Some of the ways to develop picking operations are:

1. Integrating numerous SKUs in the similar bin position decreases picking efficiency. Time and motion studies are done to confirm that there is a specific time penalty connected to mixing numerous SKUs into the similar bin position.


2. Decreasing travel time develops order picking productivity. This is the reason to use batch and cluster order picking approach in warehouses.

 

3. Traditional order picking productivity enhances when it is at floor level.

 

4. Order picking output gets better with hit density.

Higher pick density = higher pick productivity

If a worker picks from one in every 1000 pick sites then the process will be comparatively slower than when the operator picks from one in every 100 pick sites.

 

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