Smart Phones- Painkiller or a Pain

Posted in Group Discussion (GD) Topics with Answers, Total Reads: 3667
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6 people are having a discussion on the topic (Matthew, Gloria, Russell, Neville, Kevin, Thomas)


Category- Technology, Social


Group Discussion Starts


Matthew: Good afternoon everyone. Today we are here to discuss one of the burning topics of the modern world – “Smart Phone: Painkiller or a Pain”. In a study undertaken by Cornell University, it was found that a smartphone can reduce the need of narcotic pain killers during and after surgery. Angry Birds, the game, was one of the reasons why patients, after a minor surgery, asked for lesser pain killer supplements.


Gloria: Would that be the only reason for calling them a painkiller? Also, research has proved that family touch reduces the time required to recuperate after the surgery. Anything that generates a positive feeling in the mind will have a positive effect on any person in pain. The question of smart phone being a painkiller or a pain is still open to debate.


Russell: Smartphones are a distraction. While such distractions would make you forget the pain you are undergoing during a surgery, they can prove to be harmful, and in some cases fatal too. Using smartphones while driving increases the risk of accidents. Accidents become 23 time more likely to happen when drivers are using their phones while driving.


Neville: I agree with Russell. Apart from distractions, smartphones are also known to cause physical injuries. A recent article described how a man tore his tendons in his thumb while playing a famous puzzle game called “Candy Crush”. The worst part about such injuries is that they are not noticed immediately after they occur. This matches with Matthew’s point about smartphones being a distraction for pain. However, this raises an important question, “Injuring and then numbing pain – can they be called painkillers?”


Kevin: Another important issue is addiction. Experts believe that smartphone usage should be restricted to 30 minutes per day. However, smartphone addiction is an important issue being faced by parents, teachers, and bosses too!



Image: pixabay


Thomas: I would like to differ on this point. Many school teachers are now moving to the e-learning approach. Smartphones have opened new vistas for students. You can get all information you need at the click of a button! Think about how smartphones have impacted businesses. Presentations can now be prepared on the go. Mobile internet technology has grown manifold in the last 5 years.


Matthew: Think about how much pain this have saved for teachers, for students, for parents, and for employees and their bosses. The pressure for gathering information and sharing knowledge has now reduced considerably. It has helped save time and save energy.


Neville: But what about the pain? A survey conducted in United Kingdom showed that more than 25% Brits complain of neck pain because of incessant smartphone use. With over 40% of the people using smartphones for non-call related use, the issue of physical pain becomes very critical.


Russell: Take the example of Twitter. The company has seen a growth of 182% in the number of smartphone users over the past year. Texting, which is a primary feature of such apps, is known to lead to soreness in the wrist, thumbs, and fingers. Sitting hunched over playing a game can lead to strain in the neck ligaments and muscles.


Gloria: Popular names have been given to such injuries – text neck, blackberry thumb, and trigger finger. These are also known as Repetitive Stress or Strain Injuries. For these injuries, people may buy over-the-counter painkillers or muscle creams to ease their pain.


Thomas: We should also consider the fact the smartphones have increased connectivity. Today, one can order movie tickets, book taxis, find restaurants, or pay bills. A lot of pain is saved because of the ease with which such tasks can be completed. Also, about the pain regarding excessive usage, new-age smartphones are now designed in such a way that they are easy to use and carry.


Kevin: While smartphones have increased access to available knowledge, they have also opened up the gates for malicious content. Also, a lot of private content can now be accessed by strangers because of the huge number of social network applications. Personal interactions have made way for over-the-phone meets.


Russell: I still believe that the painkiller effect of smartphones is overshadowed by their “pain-giver” effect. Smartphones may have reduced the hassle of travel or physical exertion, but their excessive use because of their addictive nature has led to new problems which face millions of new generation individuals.


Conclusion

Though it is true that smartphones have reduced the time and energy required to perform critical tasks, their misuse has led to a lot of new age injuries like trigger finder, blackberry thumb, and text neck. The question of smartphones being painkillers or a pain is still open to debate. Each side has its own strong points. Therefore, only time will tell which side overshadows the other.


Facts related to the topic

• In a study undertaken by Cornell University, it was found that a smartphone can reduce the need of narcotic pain killers during and after surgery

• Angry Birds, the game, was one of the reasons why patients, after a minor surgery, asked for lesser pain killer supplements

• Research has proved that family touch reduces the time required to recuperate after the surgery

• Accidents become 23 time more likely to happen when drivers are using their phones while driving

• A recent article described how a man tore his tendons in his thumb while playing a famous puzzle game called “Candy Crush”

• Experts believe that smartphone usage should be restricted to 30 minutes per day

• A survey conducted in United Kingdom showed that more than 25% Brits complain of neck pain because of incessant smartphone use

• With over 40% of the people using smartphones for non-call related use, the issue of physical pain becomes very critical

• Popular names have been given to smartphone-related injuries – text neck, blackberry thumb, and trigger finger

• These are also known as Repetitive Stress or Strain Injuries


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