Can India Become the Human Capital of the World?

Posted in Group Discussion (GD) Topics with Answers, Total Reads: 931
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6 people are having a discussion on the topic (Abhishek, Mohit, Anamika, Shikha, Maulik, Anusha)


Category: Management


Group Discussion Starts


Abhishek: Good Morning friends, topic for group discussion for us today is Can India become the human capital of the world? Given the advantage of young population - highest number of people between 18 and 30 years of age, I think we do have the potential to become the human capital of the world.


Anamika: Yeah. In July 2015, Prime Minister, Mr. Narendra Modi pointed launched Skill India Mission and pointed out that India can become the human capital of the world.


Shikha: Rightly so, as already pointed out, with the immense presence of young population, with a little bit of guide, India can become the human capital of the world


Anamika: India already produces largest number of engineers, doctors etc. in the world


Maulik: If we look at the current scenario, In Human Capital Index, India is ranked at hundredth position. This Index indicates development and deployment of human resources. It is shameful for us that we are ranked even below our neighbours Bangladesh, Bhutan and Sri Lanka and our BRICS peers too.


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Mohit: Exactly, India has the required skills. If we establish proper training in various sectors, youth will become employable. This also includes self-employment and India can lead in this.


Anusha: I agree with the points that India can become so called human capital and can become more and more powerful, however, unless the proper education is imparted and proper health care facilities are not introduced, especially in rural parts, it would be tough for us.


Abhishek: That is true my friend, however, with the schemes that our Government is implementing these days, are high on innovations, cater to our young population advantage and are in line with our target of becoming human capital of the world.


Anamika: Yes, and more so this young population is being facilitated by opening up of more and more educational institutes like IITs, IIMs, and AIIMSes etc.


Shikha: At the high level, India actually has one of the best Human Capital as demonstrated by the highest acceptance rate in the World by Ivy League schools for IITians.


Maulik: The problem is not with the skills and the amount of talent. We see that huge chunk of this top talent is actually lost to foreign countries due to poor quality of life and research opportunities in India.


Anusha: Also, difficult labour laws also make India and unattractive proposition in this market. Hence, the dream of becoming human Capital is pretty far off.


Mohit: Let alone those things, even our education system is yet to completely cover total population - strong bias in youth towards careers in services sector leading to lack of right mix in labour market


Anusha: Also there are many hurdles like drug addiction, crime against women, alcohol consumption etc. in the way, and unless we cross these barriers it would be very hard to reach at the position we want to reach at.


Abhishek: Friends, we all are right here, if fact our government also understands this and hence has planned to open new IITs, IIMs and other institutions so that the top  quality education is provided and this in turn raises the standards of education. In the long term, this might increase the standard of living as well.


Shikha: Exactly, National Skill Development Mission, National Policy for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship - if these programmes are run well then we surely can reach the dream that we want to reach at.


Anamika: Yes and the major challenge would be of the training to be provided to more than 40 crore people - this number exceeds the population of most countries of the world!


Abhishek: With the programs like Make in India, more jobs would be generated, and we would have more people available, hence we can reach to a better economic level.


Mohit: In a way you are right, our contribution to Silicon Valley (Sundar Pichai, Satya Nadela) and brain drain to US indicate the quality of our human capital but is yet to be tapped in India.


Anusha: If we look at the types of human capital, there are two- low level and high level. In low level, India is out competed by China, Vietnam etc. due to high prices and dismal productivity


Maulik: We can conclude the discussion with- Improve quality of life for high level and solve labour law and productivity issues at low level to become human capital of the world.


Conclusion

In July 2015, Prime Minister, Mr. Narendra Modi pointed launched Skill India Mission and pointed out that India can become the human capital of the world. With his vision and our strategies we might reach to the stand and say that we are the human capital of the world. However the way to reach there is not easy. In low level we have competitions from China, Vietnam etc. Our government has focused on developing our skilled talent pool and hence have moved ahead and opened many new institutes like IIMs and IITs etc. Given everything, we still are not able to provide the required quality of life and hence people fly away from here. If we are able to improve quality of life for high level and solve labour law and productivity issues at low level, we can become human capital of the world.


Facts related to the topic

• India has the highest number of young people, Median age in India is 27 years

• Prime Minister Modi has this vision that India is to become the human capital of the world

• Number of IITs in 2015: 19

• Number of IIMs in 2015: 15

• Number of AIIMSs in 2015: 7

• Number of NITs in 2015: 31

• Major programs for skill development: National Skill Development Mission, National Policy for Skill Development and Entrepreneurship

• India is ranked at 100th position in the Human Capital Index, behind BRICS peers and neighbours like Bhutan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka



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