Is IPL a boon for Indian Cricket?

Posted in Group Discussion (GD) Topics with Answers, Total Reads: 1297
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6 people are having a discussion on the topic (Abish, Barathi, Chitra, David, Ezhilan, Felix)


Category: Sports



Group Discussion Starts



Chitra: Hello all, Good morning!! We are here for a group discussion on Indian Premier League as a boon to Indian cricket. As everyone knows, The IPL is the most-watched Twenty20 league worldwide and it plays a huge role in cricket’s growth. Let’s have our discussion considering all the points related to IPL.


David: Yes, added to it the fact is that the brand value of IPL was estimated to be US$7.2 billion in 2014, which is even more than that of the Olympics. It cannot be neglected while considering its importance.


Abish: David has made a valuable point here and it’s not only about the money that is being involved in this tournament. There are several aspects need to be considered, as the impact that it has made on the society as a whole is immense.


Felix: He is right. It has its own reputations and controversies which need to be discussed here. On one side, According to BCCI, the 2015 IPL season contributed ₹11.5 billion to the GDP of Indian economy. But on the other side, it is being questioned for controversies as match and player fixing, so many scandals etc.


Barathi: We are missing a very important point over here. It plays huge role in bringing out the real talents out. As a sample, Ashok Dinda was actually called in KKR for practice in nets but his performance impressed Ricky Ponting so much that he got the KKR contract ahead of his Ranji match.


image:pixabay


Ezhilan: I accept Barathi’s pitch here. The IPL gave players like Dinda a chance to showcase their talent on the world stage, while also giving others a hope to continue chasing their dreams. Playing for the country was no more the be all and end all of everything because playing in the IPL was as good as that.


Barathi: Yes friends, the likes of R. Ashwin, Ravindra Jadeja, Rahul Sharma and Yusuf Pathan may not have caught the attention of the selectors with their Ranji Trophy performances. But their talent was tough to ignore post their IPL success.


Chitra: But Barathi, if there is a positive side for it, there are also certain negative aspects. Playing one full year in all three formats for Team India, a player stands to earn between USD 1-1.5 million, which includes the annual central contract fee too. Obviously, one needs to be a player of extraordinary ability to not only fulfill the demands of three different formats but also remain super-fit too, to avoid missing tournaments due to injury. On the contrary, a player of very limited abilities can earn USD 2 million and above for playing 14 T20 matches lasting 3 hours each over 8 weeks.


Felix: Great point Chitra. Because this may even force players not to play for the country, so that they would be perfectly fit during the short term IPL season which cannot be accepted as a true cricket fan. Adding to this, I read as foreign players are skipping to play for their nation considering IPL as they would earn more here. West Indies players are good example.


Barathi:
Yes Felix, but West Indian cricket board is notorious for paying its players very less salary. This should be the reason for their interest in IPL.


Abish:
And politics is playing a spoil sport here as well. IPL has been in center of such controversies in the past. E.g. Pakistan players and Sri Lankan players have felt the issue. It is utterly disappointing that because of the views of some, the vast majority of cricket fans are served a tournament that’s not as good as it should be


David: Apart from that, the sacredness of cricket is being spoiled through some worst controversies. Teams getting banned for their owners being involved in match fixing, players losing their career by being a part of those instances doesn’t speak good about cricket to the world. It brings down the legacies that were brought by many cricket legends.


Chitra: Yes David, to curb that out The BCCI must adopt a "Zero Tolerance Policy" in matters of corruption in the game. It must adopt a far more pro-active role. Pending enactment of such law by the Parliament is necessary that the Anti-Corruption Unit of the BCCI be substantially strengthened with immediate effect.


Abish:
I agree with this point Chitra. But the statistics indicate that the game is losing its popularity. Over exposure of cricket, decreasing TV audience, decrease in TV sponsorship fees and reduced ads point to the reduced interest. Such incidents are few but they have managed to erode on the credibility of the IPL tournament.


Chitra: Yes Abish you are right and even the revenue model indicates that a large amount of money is involved in player's wages, fees that franchises pay to BCCI and other expenses with very high costs, the IPL model seems to be non-sustainable. There is a great danger that after a few more seasons, the game will lose its viability and attraction and the event may have to close down or it will have to change its present format of high cost structures.


Conclusion

And to summarize as a whole with whatever that is discusses so far, IPL has its own merits in terms of bringing up talents and taking the sports all through the world as football does. But certain controversies should be handled through stringent laws and regulations so that it does not affect the credibility of the game. It would be really good, if the tournament is conducted once in two years to keep up the people more interested towards this excited tournament.


Facts related to the topic

1. The brand value of IPL was estimated to be US$7.2 billion in 2014
2. The 2015 IPL season contributed ₹11.5 billion to the GDP of Indian economy.
3. Important players like R. Ashwin, Ravindra Jadeja, Rahul Sharma and Yusuf Pathan are brought out through IPL
4. Players could earn better for playing the short term IPL when compared to that of playing all the three formats for their country.
5. In 2010, the IPL became the first sporting event to be broadcast live on YouTube.



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